Manor House Flessenow

For a long time, Flessenow was part of the Retgendorf estate. Around 1800, it was owned by Bernhard Joachim von Bülow from the house of Camin (1747 – 1826), who served in the diplomatic service at the Stockholm Royal Court among other things. He sold the property, and it is presumed that it had many different owners in the years that followed.




According to one statement, Flessenow was, just like Wendenhof near Carlshöhe north of Schwerin, owned for some time by a manufacturer family from Schwerin. The last owner was expropriated in 1945.

After 1945, a quarantine camp had been set up in the Flessenow forest where hundreds of refugees lived and suffered from hunger and disease. The refugee cemetery is now listed under national heritage protection. One architectural eye-catcher in the region are the Karelo-Finnish huts that were built by Soviet soldiers and later inhabited by refugees.

The Flessenow manor house is a Neo-Renaissance plastered building.

In the GDR times, the house was lived in and also accommodated the sales point of the village. It has been vacant for some years. A huge part of the estate has been demolished. One remarkable chest nut avenue stretches as far as Lake Schwerin.

Flessenow is now a popular holiday resort with a campsite, youth hostel, and hotel.


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